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Similes

 

A simile is known as a 'figure of speech'. A figure of speech is when a word or a group of words is used to heighten meaning or to add effect. Have you ever heard someone compare something to something else? For example, he's as brave as a lion! I am sure you have heard lots of similes before. One way to remember the definition of a simile is to think of the word similar. Similes compare things by saying they are similar to each other. Similes use the words 'like' and 'as'.
 

Example: 'as cheeky as a monkey' is a simile

 

A sentence for this simile would be: She is as cheeky as a monkey

 

Look at this list of common similes

like two peas in a pod

as big as a bus

as big as an elephant

as quiet as a mouse

as blind as a bat

as clean as a whistle

as clear as mud

as cool as a cucumber

as cunning as a fox

as dry as a bone

as fresh as a daisy

as hard as nails

as light as a feather

as large as life

as mad as a hatter

as poor as dirt

as sick as a dog

as wise as an owl

 

You may have heard some or all of the similes above. Can you put each of them into a sentence? What does each simile mean?
 
What does ‘as hard as nails mean?' It means that someone is very tough!
We can put this simile into a sentence. Tyrone is as hard as nails.
 
What does ‘as cunning as a fox' mean? It means that the person is very cunning.
We can put this simile into a sentence. Sally was as cunning as a fox.
 
 

Metaphors

 
Metaphors are another way to compare things. They are also a figure of speech. When we use a metaphor we say that things are the same. Have you ever been told you are champion or an angel? That is a metaphor.
 
Metaphors say that something ‘is' the same as another thing. Metaphors sometimes use the word 'is'. They are a direct way of comparing two things.
 

We can make the following simile into a metaphor.

She is as cheeky as a monkey. (simile)

She is a cheeky monkey. (metaphor)

 

 

Look at this list of metaphors:
to be all ears

to be heavy eyed

hard of hearing

to lead a dog's life

the black sheep of the family

you are the light of the world.

bull in a china shop

a little birdie told me

to hold one's tongue

 
You may have heard some or all of the metaphors above. Can you put each of them into a sentence? What does each metaphor mean?
 
 

What does 'to hold one's tongue' mean? It means to say nothing or to stop speaking.

We can put this metaphor into a sentence. Carly wanted to tell Sharon what happened but she decided to hold her tongue.
 

What does ‘to be all ears' mean? It means you are eager to listen to someone.

We can put this metaphor into a sentence. I am all ears; tell me what happened at the party.

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Chapters: Similes and metaphors

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